How to root your android smartphone / tablet

First of all what is rooting?  Rooting is jailbreaking for Androids and allows users to dive deeper into a phone’s sub-system. Essentially, it’ll allow you to access the entire operating system and be able to customize just about anything on your Android. With root access, you can get around any restrictions that your manufacturer or carrier may have applied. You can run more apps, you can overclock or underclock your processor, and you can replace the firmware.

WARNING: Rooting your device can expose you to more security risks, void your warranty, can cause update issues or break your device entirely.

So how to root your device? First of all it depends on the device itself and the solution may not be always the same. For more detail information you can check the xda-developers forums, where you can look for other means if the method below doesn’t work for you.

Step 1: You will need a program like KingoRoot. You can download it from HERE . After your download complete install Kingo Android Root.

Step 2: Enable USB debugging mode on your phone. If it’s running Android 4.0 or 4.1, tap Settings, Developer Options, then tick the box for “USB debugging.” (You may need to switch “Developer options” to On before you can do so.) On Android 4.2, tap Settings, About Phone, Developer Options, and then tick USB debugging.” Then tap OK to approve the setting change.

Enable_USB_debugging_Android

On Android 4.3 and later (including 5.0, though this also applies to some versions of 4.2), tap Settings, About Phone, then scroll down to Build Number. Tap it seven times, at which point you should see the message, “You are now a developer!”

With that done, tap Settings, About Phone, Developer Options, and then tick USB debugging.” Then tap OK to approve the setting change.

Step 3: Run Android Root on your PC, then connect your phone via its USB sync cable. After a moment, the former should show a connection to the latter. Your device screen may show an “Allow USB debugging?” pop-up. Tick “Always allow from this computer,” then tap OK.
Kingo-ROOT_1

Step 4: Click Root, then sit back and wait while the utility does its thing. The aforementioned Samsung Galaxy took all of about two minutes, including the automated reboot at the end.

And that’s all there is to it. If you decide you want to reverse the process, just run Android Root again, connect your phone, then click Remove Root.

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